spring 2009

m E M B E R S H I P
Bridging the electronic divide: NLMA urges physicians to get connected


Stock Photo

 

 

As the NLMA continues its efforts to identify priority issues and principles that will guide the Association into the next round of negotiations, it is urging all members who receive updates by mail to submit their e-mail address as their primary means of receiving NLMA communications. 

By Jonathan Carpenter

As the NLMA continues its efforts to identify priority issues and principles that will guide the Association into the next round of negotiations, it is vital that members are kept informed about key issues and have an opportunity to share their input. That’s why the NLMA is urging all members who receive urgent NLMA updates by mail to submit their e-mail address as their primary means of receiving NLMA communications.

Currently, more than 380 practicing physicians still use fax and postal mail to receive urgent NLMA communications such as the President’s Letter and Negotiations Bulletins. While the majority of members have e-mail addresses, many have not opted to receive e-mail notifications and may be unaware that the option exists. As a result, postal and fax users do not receive information that is only available through e-Updates and have fewer opportunities to respond to announcements in real-time.

Unlike postal mail, e-mail allows recipients to contribute immediate and frequent feedback within minutes of delivery. Jupiter Communications estimates that while paper-based campaigns receive an average one to two per cent response rate;
e-mail campaigns can receive a response rate of five to 15 per cent. Market research also indicates that people generally read e-mail within 48 hours of receiving it, which is extremely important when the Association needs to keep members up-to-date about critical issues.

Producing, delivering and archiving e-mail also reduces paper consumption and eliminates mailing costs. While traditional direct mail typically costs between $1 and $2 per letter, e-mail campaigns can cost as little as pennies per item.

The NLMA uses a software program called Campaigner to store its e-mail database and send e-mail campaigns. The software allows NLMA to measure e-mail metrics by tracking data codes to monitor and report on how many e-mails are opened, the open duration and what links were clicked on in the e-mail.

NLMA staff can then compare e-mail statistics to determine what content generates the most opens so that messages can be tailored to accommodate members’ needs and interests. Archived campaigns and responses can also be indexed, searched and recalled for evaluation or follow-up.

Aligning all NLMA communications to e-mail also encourages mid- and late-adopters to use technology in their daily practice. How often physicians use IT resources is a key factor in the acquisition of skills associated with integrating emerging technologies, such as EMR, in the clinical setting. E-mail adoption not only keeps members engaged with the Aassociation, it helps drive members to the NLMA website where they can obtain additional information. The NLMA is also exploring options to deliver future electronic updates in PDA and Blackberry-friendly formats.

Members can submit their e-mail address to the NLMA via
e-mail or via our website.  If you do not have an e-mail address through your employer or Internet service provider, you can sign up for a free account with such as vendors as Yahoo!, Hotmail or Gmail.

Feedback

Rating

 Poor Average Good Excellent 

 

Comments

 

Site Map | DisclaimerCredits | Webmaster
© Newfoundland and Labrador Medical Association (NLMA)

Articles

Summary

Cameron report provides blueprint for correcting system

Where you can find the Cameron Commission report online

Budget tax break means big IT savings for MDs

Arthritis Society calls for chronic disease management strategy   

Sinus infections, new dementia tool, Type 1 diabetes

Bridging the electronic divide: NLMA urges physicians to get connected

New utilization rules for vitamin D testing

My patient has cancer... How can I help?

Helping immigrants navigate the health care system

Lessons from history

New central intake number for child/adolescent mental health

Medical professional corporation may now own OMA group life insurance

Newer may not be better in colorectal cancer screening

Teaching physicians to lead the PMI way

Conference addresses pandemic planning

Long-term care financial assessment service

Eastern Health begins needs assessment in Northeast Avalon

Research paper identifies psoriasis genes

Obesity genes identified

Attracting Aboriginal students to medicine

Order of Canada for Dr. John Lewis

St. John’s physician named Specialist of the Year

Planning for the future

Practice-based preceptor portal

Topics
A&E
AGM
Arbitration
Archives
Clinical Practice
CMA News
Common Revolt Against Paperwork (C.R.A.P.)
Corporate
Doctors in the News
Education
Events
Executive Director's Message
Financial
General Council
Government Relations
Health Administration
Health Policy
Health Promotion
Health Technology
In Memoriam
Information Technology
Job Action
Membership
Perspectives
Physician Wellness
Practice Management
Primary Care Renewal
Privacy
Resident's Corner
Staff
WHSCC
Inserts
NLPDP Newsletter Behind the Scenes  Spring 2009 (PDF)
In Touch Winter 2009 (PDF)
Issues
Winter 2013
Summer 2013
Spring 2013
Winter 2012
Fall 2012
Summer 2012
Spring 2012
Winter 2011
Fall 2011
Summer 2011
Spring 2011
Winter 2010-11
Fall 2010
Summer 2010
Spring 2010
Winter 2009
Fall 2009
Summer 2009
Spring 2009
Winter 2008
Fall 2008
Summer 2008
Spring 2008
Winter 2007
Fall 2007
Summer 2007
Spring 2007
Winter 2006
Fall 2006
Summer 2006
Spring 2006
Winter 2005
Fall 2005
Summer 2005
Spring 2005
Winter 2004
Fall 2004
Summer 2004
Spring 2004
Winter 2003
Fall 2003
Summer 2003
Spring 2003
Fall/Winter 2002
Nexus
Nexus DEFINED
A connected group or series; a bond, a connection.

Nexus is published quarterly for Newfoundland and Labrador's physicians. It is a forum for the exchange of views, ideas and information for members.